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twitter.com/coviolgrand:

    "It is customary for many people to blame economics for being backward. Now it is quite obvious that our economic theory is not perfect. There is no such thing as perfection in human knowledge, nor for that matter in any other human achievement. Omniscience is denied to man. The most elaborate theory that seems to satisfy completely our thirst for knowledge may one day be amended or supplanted by a new theory. Science does not give us absolute and final certainty. It only gives us assurances within the limits of our mental abilities and the prevailing state of scientific thought. A scientific system is but one station in an endless progressing search for knowledge. It is necessarily affected by the insufficiency inherent in every human effort. But to acknowledge these facts does not means that present-day economics is backward. It merely means that economics is a living thing —- and to live implies both imperfection and change."

    Ludwig von Mises, Human Action

    Tell me again about how Mises is an overly dogmatic, radical apriorist who thinks all empirical evidence should bow to theory?

    (via moralanarchism)

    (Source: fatal-conceit, via moralanarchism)

    — 3 days ago with 28 notes

    "Curing AIDS? Shit, that’s like Cadillac making a car that lasts for 50 years. And you know they can do it, but they ain’t going to do nothing that fucking dumb. Shit, they got metal on the Space Shuttle that can go around the Moon and withstand  temperatures of up to 20,000 degrees, you mean to tell me you don’t think they can make an El Dorado with a fuckin’ bumper that don’t fall off?"

    - Chris Rock (“Bigger and Blacker”, 1999)

    (Source: materiajunkie, via federalprime)

    — 3 days ago with 63314 notes
    tacanderson:

Scientists Made Lab-Grown Brains to Study Brain Hacking 

Over the last couple years, scientists have grown blood vessels, skin, parts of organs, and even vaginas in the lab. But now, for the first time, they’ve managed to grow three dimensional, “brain-like” tissue (from rats).
In a paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Tufts University researcher David Kaplan details a process that has allowed him and his team to make 3D brain tissue to study injury.
It’s not, of course, a real brain, you can’t just pop it into a living creature and expect it to function, and there’s a lot more to a brain than a bunch of neurons. But these brains have both grey matter and white matter, organize themselves in a manner much like a brain, and apparently express a much higher number of genes than neurons do when they are simply grown on a two dimensional dish.
The brains grown at Tufts are also unlike the “mini brains” that have been grown before: Those were created using stem cells, and the lack of blood supply keeps them limited to just four millimeters in diameter. Tufts’ brains shouldn’t have that limitation, and they’re able to survive for long periods in the lab, allowing longer-term growth and study.

While the application of studying brain injury (and implants and brain-hacking) is really interesting, it’s important to note the continued and rapid evolution (used non-ironically) of our ability to grow human body parts. Between growing and 3D printing, we’ll soon be able to replace almost any body part with a suitable, biological replacement.
First the replacement parts will be suitable, but not perfect, replacements, then they’ll become just as good in most ways, and then quickly we’ll have parts better than the original. That’s when things get crazy. 


Wow

    tacanderson:

    Scientists Made Lab-Grown Brains to Study Brain Hacking 

    Over the last couple years, scientists have grown blood vessels, skin, parts of organs, and even vaginas in the lab. But now, for the first time, they’ve managed to grow three dimensional, “brain-like” tissue (from rats).

    In a paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Tufts University researcher David Kaplan details a process that has allowed him and his team to make 3D brain tissue to study injury.

    It’s not, of course, a real brain, you can’t just pop it into a living creature and expect it to function, and there’s a lot more to a brain than a bunch of neurons. But these brains have both grey matter and white matter, organize themselves in a manner much like a brain, and apparently express a much higher number of genes than neurons do when they are simply grown on a two dimensional dish.

    The brains grown at Tufts are also unlike the “mini brains” that have been grown before: Those were created using stem cells, and the lack of blood supply keeps them limited to just four millimeters in diameter. Tufts’ brains shouldn’t have that limitation, and they’re able to survive for long periods in the lab, allowing longer-term growth and study.

    While the application of studying brain injury (and implants and brain-hacking) is really interesting, it’s important to note the continued and rapid evolution (used non-ironically) of our ability to grow human body parts. Between growing and 3D printing, we’ll soon be able to replace almost any body part with a suitable, biological replacement.

    First the replacement parts will be suitable, but not perfect, replacements, then they’ll become just as good in most ways, and then quickly we’ll have parts better than the original. That’s when things get crazy. 

    Wow

    (Source: motherboardtv, via emergentfutures)

    — 3 days ago with 73 notes

    shadyufo:

    I’m so proud of my Indian corn! I’ve never grown any before but I’m in love with it. Each one is like opening up a wrapped present with no idea what’s inside.

    I picked these fairly early because I wanted to see how they were doing. There are loads more to come soon!

    (via hqcreations)

    — 3 days ago with 491 notes
    glass-monsters:

stunningpicture:

The days news, in one photo

Relevant right now

    glass-monsters:

    stunningpicture:

    The days news, in one photo

    Relevant right now

    (via probablyz)

    — 3 days ago with 183267 notes